Title
Gene expression responses linked to reproduction effect concentrations (<tex>$EC_{10,20,50,90}$</tex>) of dimethoate, atrazine and carbendazim, in **Enchytraeus albidus** Gene expression responses linked to reproduction effect concentrations (<tex>$EC_{10,20,50,90}$</tex>) of dimethoate, atrazine and carbendazim, in **Enchytraeus albidus**
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Sciences. Biology
Publication type
article
Publication
Subject
Biology
Human medicine
Source (journal)
PLoS ONE
Volume/pages
7(2012) :4 , 10 p.
ISSN
1932-6203
Article Reference
e36068
Carrier
E-only publicatie
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Background Molecular mechanisms of response to pesticides are scarce and information on such responses from soil invertebrates is almost inexistent. Enchytraeus albidus (Oligochaeta) is a standard soil ecotoxicology model species for which effects of many pesticides are known on survival, reproduction and avoidance behaviour. With the recent microarray development additional information can be retrieved on the molecular effects. Methodology/Principal Findings Experiments were performed to investigate the transcription responses of E. albidus when exposed to three pesticides dimethoate (insecticide), atrazine (herbicide) and carbendazim (fungicide) in a range of concentrations that inhibited reproduction by 10%, 20%, 50% and 90% (EC10, EC20, EC50 and EC90, respectively). The goal of this study was to further identify key biological processes affected by each compound and if dose-related. All three pesticides significantly affected biological processes like translation, regulation of the cell cycle or general response to stress. Intracellular signalling and microtubule-based movement were affected by dimethoate and carbendazim whereas atrazine affected lipid and steroid metabolism (also by dimethoate) or carbohydrate metabolism (also by carbendazim). Response to DNA damage/DNA repair was exclusively affected by carbendazim. Conclusions Changes in gene expression were significantly altered after 2 days of exposure in a dose-related manner. The mechanisms of response were comparable with the ones for mammals, suggesting across species conserved modes of action. The present results indicate the potential of using gene expression in risk assessment and the advantage as early markers.
Full text (open access)
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/irua/f8caa0/15c90719.pdf
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