Title
Effect of prolyl hydroxylase domain-2 haplodeficiency on the hepatocarcinogenesis in mice Effect of prolyl hydroxylase domain-2 haplodeficiency on the hepatocarcinogenesis in mice
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences. Veterinary Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Amsterdam ,
Subject
Veterinary medicine
Source (journal)
Journal of hepatology. - Amsterdam
Volume/pages
57(2012) :1 , p. 61-68
ISSN
0168-8278
ISI
000305811300011
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Background & Aims: The two major primary liver cancers in adults are hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. These tumors rapidly outgrow their vascular supply and become hypoxic, resulting in the production of hypoxia inducible factors. Recently, interest has grown in the regulators of these factors. Several reports have been published describing the role of prolyl hydroxylase domains - the key oxygen sensor responsible for the degradation of hypoxia inducible factors - in tumor progression and vascularisation. The effect of prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 on the pathogenesis of liver cancer has never been studied. Methods: A diethylnitrosamine-induced mouse model was used in this study, allowing primary hepatic tumors to occur as a result of chronic liver damage. Several parameters of prolyl hydroxylase domain 2-haplodeficient mice were compared to those of wild type mice, thereby focussing on the expression of angiogenic factors and on the hepatic progenitor cell activation and differentiation. Results: This study shows that inhibiting prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 increases the hepatocarcinogenesis and stimulates the development of cholangiocarcinoma. Furthermore, PHD2 deficiency and the accompanying continuous HIF activation, selected for a more metastatic tumor phenotype. Conclusions: The effect of prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 deficiency on hepatocarcinogenesis hold a great potential for therapeutic intervention, since hypoxia and the selection for a more aggressive cholangiocarcinoma phenotype might also have a repercussion on patients receiving long-term treatment with anti-angiogenic compounds. (C) 2012 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
E-info
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