Publication
Title
Placebo-controlled phase 3 study of oral BG-12 for relapsing multiple sclerosis
Author
Abstract
Background BG-12 (dimethyl fumarate) was shown to have antiinflammatory and cytoprotective properties in preclinical experiments and to result in significant reductions in disease activity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a phase 2, placebo-controlled study involving patients with relapsingremitting multiple sclerosis. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 study involving patients with relapsingremitting multiple sclerosis. Patients were randomly assigned to receive oral BG-12 at a dose of 240 mg twice daily, BG-12 at a dose of 240 mg three times daily, or placebo. The primary end point was the proportion of patients who had a relapse by 2 years. Other end points included the annualized relapse rate, the time to confirmed progression of disability, and findings on MRI. Results The estimated proportion of patients who had a relapse was significantly lower in the two BG-12 groups than in the placebo group (27% with BG-12 twice daily and 26% with BG-12 thrice daily vs. 46% with placebo, P<0.001 for both comparisons). The annualized relapse rate at 2 years was 0.17 in the twice-daily BG-12 group and 0.19 in the thrice-daily BG-12 group, as compared with 0.36 in the placebo group, representing relative reductions of 53% and 48% with the two BG-12 regimens, respectively (P<0.001 for the comparison of each BG-12 regimen with placebo). The estimated proportion of patients with confirmed progression of disability was 16% in the twice-daily BG-12 group, 18% in the thrice-daily BG-12 group, and 27% in the placebo group, with significant relative risk reductions of 38% with BG-12 twice daily (P=0.005) and 34% with BG-12 thrice daily (P=0.01). BG-12 also significantly reduced the number of gadolinium-enhancing lesions and of new or enlarging T2-weighted hyperintense lesions (P<0.001 for the comparison of each BG-12 regimen with placebo). Adverse events associated with BG-12 included flushing and gastrointestinal events, such as diarrhea, nausea, and upper abdominal pain, as well as decreased lymphocyte counts and elevated liver aminotransferase levels. Conclusions In patients with relapsingremitting multiple sclerosis, both BG-12 regimens, as compared with placebo, significantly reduced the proportion of patients who had a relapse, the annualized relapse rate, the rate of disability progression, and the number of lesions on MRI. (Funded by Biogen Idec; DEFINE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00420212.)
Language
English
Source (journal)
The New England journal of medicine. - Boston, Mass., 1928, currens
Publication
Boston, Mass. : 2012
ISSN
0028-4793 [print]
1533-4406 [online]
Volume/pages
367:12(2012), p. 1098-1107
ISI
000308861800005
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (publisher's version - intranet only)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 02.10.2012
Last edited 02.11.2017
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