Title
Scapular positioning in patients with shoulder pain : a study examining the reliability and clinical importance of 3 clinical tests Scapular positioning in patients with shoulder pain : a study examining the reliability and clinical importance of 3 clinical tests
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Chicago, Ill. ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation. - Chicago, Ill., 1952, currens
Volume/pages
86(2005) :7 , p. 1349-1355
ISSN
0003-9993
ISI
000230412500013
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Abstract
Objective To examine the interobserver reliability, internal consistency, and clinical importance of 3 clinical tests for the assessment of scapular positioning in patients with shoulder pain. Design Prospective repeated-measures design. Setting Private practices for physical therapy and hospital outpatient physical therapy divisions. Participants Twenty-nine patients with shoulder pain who were diagnosed by a physician as having a shoulder disorder. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Study participants filled in a visual analog scale for pain and the Shoulder Disability Questionnaire. Next, 2 assessors performed the following tests: measurement of the distance between the posterior border of the acromion and the table, measurement of the distance from the medial scapular border to the fourth thoracic spinous processes, and the lateral scapular slide test. Results The interobserver reliability coefficients were greater than .88 (intraclass correlation coefficients) for the measurement of the distance between the posterior border of the acromion and the table, were greater than .50 for the measurement of the distance from the medial scapular border to the fourth thoracic spinous processes, and were greater than .70 for the lateral scapular slide test. The Cronbach α coefficient for internal consistency for all tests was .88. No associations between the outcome of the tests and self-reported pain severity or disability were found. Conclusions These data provide evidence favoring the interobserver reliability of 2 of 3 tests for the assessment of scapular positioning in patients with shoulder pain. The clinical importance of the tests outcomes, however, is questionable.
E-info
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