Title
Elevated serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-6 receptor concentrations in posttraumatic stress disorder following accidental man-made traumatic events Elevated serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-6 receptor concentrations in posttraumatic stress disorder following accidental man-made traumatic events
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
New York, N.Y. ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Biological psychiatry. - New York, N.Y.
Volume/pages
45(1999) :7 , p. 833-839
ISSN
0006-3223
ISI
000079518900005
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Background: Recently, it has been reported that serum interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), but not soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R), concentrations were significantly higher in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than in normal volunteers, and that psychological stress in humans is associated with increased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6. Methods: The aim of the present study was to examine the inflammatory response system in patients with PTSD through measurements of serum IL-6, sIL-6R, sgp130 (the IL-6 signal transducing protein), sIL-1R antagonist (sIL-1RA; an endogenous IL-1 receptor antagonist), CC16 (an endogenous anticytokine), and sCD8 (the T suppressor-cytotoxic antigen). Results: Serum IL-6 and sIL-6R, but not sgp130, sIL-RA, CC16, or sCD8, concentrations were significantly higher in PTSD patients than in normal volunteers. Serum sIL-6R concentrations were significantly higher in PTSD patients with concurrent major depression than in PTSD patients without major depression and normal volunteers. There were no significant relationships between serum IL-6 or sIL-6R and severity measures of PTSD. Conclusions: The results suggest that PTSD is associated with increased IL-6 signaling. It is hypothesized that stress-induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines is involved in the catecholaminergic modulation of anxiety reactions. (C) 1999 Society of Biological Psychiatry.
E-info
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