Title
Can exercise limits prevent post-exertional malaise in chronic fatigue syndrome? An uncontrolled clinical trial Can exercise limits prevent post-exertional malaise in chronic fatigue syndrome? An uncontrolled clinical trial
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
London ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Clinical rehabilitation. - London
Volume/pages
22(2008) :5 , p. 426-435
ISSN
0269-2155
0269-2155
ISI
000256132100005
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Objective: It was hypothesized that the use of exercise limits prevents symptom increases and worsening of their health status following a walking exercise in people with chronic fatigue syndrome. Design: An uncontrolled clinical trial (semi-experimental design). Setting: Outpatient clinic of a university department. Subjects: Twenty-four patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Interventions: Subjects undertook a walking test with the two concurrent exercise limits. Each subject walked at an intensity where the maximum heart rate was determined by heart rate corresponding to the respiratory exchange ratio = 1.0 derived from a previous submaximal exercise test and for a duration calculated from how long each patient felt they were able to walk. Main outcome measures: The Short Form 36 Health Survey or SF-36, the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptom List, and the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Activities and Participation Questionnaire were filled in prior to, immediately after and 24 hours after exercise. Results: The fatigue increase observed immediately post-exercise (P = 0.006) returned to pre-exercise levels 24 hours post-exercise. The increase in pain observed immediately post-exercise was retained at 24 hours post-exercise (P = 0.03). Fourteen of the 24 subjects experienced a clinically meaningful change in bodily pain (change of SF-36 bodily pain score >= 10); 6 indicated that the exercise bout had slightly worsened their health status, and 2 had a clinically meaningful decrease in vitality (change of SF-36 vitality score >= 20). There was no change in activity limitations/participation restrictions. Conclusion: It was shown that the use of exercise limits (limiting both the intensity and duration of exercise) prevents important health status changes following a walking exercise in people with chronic fatigue syndrome, but was unable to prevent short-term symptom increases.
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