Publication
Title
Management of diabetes in Guinean traditional medicine : an ethnobotanical investigation in the coastal lowlands
Author
Abstract
Ethnopharmacological relevance: This survey was carried out in the coastal lowlands of Guinea-Conakry in order to make an inventory of plants used by traditional healers, herbalists and diabetic patients for the management of diabetes mellitus. Materials and methods: Frequent ethnomedical and ethnobotanical investigations were conducted from June 2008 to December 2009 in Conakry, Kindia, Forecariah, Dubreka, Boke, Fria and Boffa. It is a cross-sectional survey and data collection is based on the interactive method. During this period a total of 112 people aged from 39 to 76 years old were interviewed. Results: During this investigation 146 plant species belonging to 55 families were collected. The most cited plants were Anacardium occidentale L. and Ficus spp., while the Fabaceae family was the most represented, followed by the Euphorbiaceae and Rubiaceae. The most frequently plant parts used by the traditional healers and the herbalists were the stem-bark and decoctions the most common preparation mode. Conclusions: It is clear that a variety of plants is used in the management and treatment of diabetes. Due to the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes, there is an urgent need for scientific investigations to rationalise the use of these traditional remedies, which could represent accessible alternative medicines for the Guinean populations. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Journal of ethnopharmacology. - Lausanne
Publication
Lausanne : 2012
ISSN
0378-8741
Volume/pages
144:2(2012), p. 353-361
ISI
000312685100018
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (publisher's version - intranet only)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 28.02.2013
Last edited 16.11.2017
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