Title
Colonoscopy and <tex>$\mu PET/CT$</tex> are valid techniques to monitor inflammation in the adoptive transfer colitis model in miceColonoscopy and <tex>$\mu PET/CT$</tex> are valid techniques to monitor inflammation in the adoptive transfer colitis model in mice
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Research group
Laboratory Experimental Medicine and Pediatrics (LEMP)
Molecular Imaging, Pathology, Radiotherapy & Oncology (MIPRO)
Publication type
article
Publication
New York, N.Y.,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Inflammatory bowel diseases. - New York, N.Y.
Volume/pages
19(2013):5, p. 967-976
ISSN
1078-0998
ISI
000336084200021
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Background: Preclinical in vivo research on inflammatory bowel diseases requires proper animal models and techniques allowing longitudinal monitoring of colonic inflammation without the need to kill animals. We evaluated colonoscopy and [mu]-positron emission tomography/computed tomography ([mu]PET/CT) as monitoring tools in a model for chronic colitis in mice. Methods: Colitis was induced by adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25-CD62L+ T cells in immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficient mice. Three study protocols were designed. In study 1, colonoscopy and [micro]PET/CT were performed once, 4 weeks after transfer. In study 2 and study 3, colitis was sequentially followed up through colonoscopy (study 2) or colonoscopy plus [micro]PET/CT (study 3). Each study included postmortem evaluation of colonic inflammation (macroscopy, microscopy, and myeloperoxidase activity). Results: In study 1, both colonoscopy and [micro]PET/CT detected colitis 4 weeks after transfer. Study 2 showed a gradual increase in colonoscopic score from week 2 (1.4 +/- 0.6) to week 8 (6.0 +/- 1.1). In study 3, colitis was detected 2 weeks after transfer by [micro]PET/CT (2.0 +/- 0.4) but not by colonoscopy, whereas both techniques detected inflammation 4 and 6 weeks after transfer. Colonoscopy correlated with [micro]PET/CT (r = 0.812, 0.884, and 0.781, respectively) and with postmortem analyses in all 3 studies. Conclusions: Adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25-CD62L+ T cells in severe combined immunodeficient mice results in a moderate chronic colitis. Evolution of colitis could be monitored over time by both colonoscopy and [micro]PET/CT. [micro]PET/CT seems to detect inflammation at an earlier time point than colonoscopy. Both techniques represent reliable and safe methods without the need to kill animals.
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