Publication
Title
The structure of color experience and the existence of surface colors
Author
Abstract
Color experience is structured. Some unique colors (red, green, yellow, and blue) appear as pure, or containing no trace of any other color. Others can be considered as a mixture of these colors, or as binary colors. According to a widespread assumption, this unique/binary structure of color experience is to be explained in terms of neurophysiological structuring (e.g., by opponent processes) and has no genuine explanatory basis in the physical stimulus. The argument from structure builds on these assumptions to argue that colors are not properties of surfaces and that color experiences are neural processes without environmental counterparts. We reconsider the argument both in terms of its logic and in the light of recent models in vision science which point at environment-involving patterns that may be at the basis of the unique/binary structure of color experience. We conclude that, in the light of internal and external problems which arise for it, the argument from structure fails.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Philosophical psychology. - Abington
Publication
Abington : 2014
ISSN
0951-5089
Volume/pages
27:3(2014), p. 384-400
ISI
000334158700005
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (publisher's version - intranet only)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 03.04.2013
Last edited 16.11.2017
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