Title
What should the surgeon aim for when performing computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty?
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
London ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
The journal of bone and joint surgery : American volume. - London, 1948, currens
Volume/pages
87(2005) :S:2 , p. 52-58
ISSN
0021-9355
1535-1386
ISI
000233879800007
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Stability of the knee is a complex issue and involves ligaments that behave differently on the medial and lateral side. Correct positioning of the components and adequate soft-tissue balancing are critical steps in successful total knee arthroplasty1. A total knee prosthesis that is implanted "too tightly" may cause limited range of motion and compromise patient satisfaction. A total knee replacement that is implanted "too loosely" will be unstable2. Medial-lateral instability is the most common type of instability and may result from incompetent collateral ligaments, incomplete correction of a preoperative deformity, or incorrect bone cuts3. Separate studies have identified instability as a leading cause of early clinical failure of a primary total knee replacement, resulting in revision within three to five years4,5.
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