Title
Unravelling the nature of postexertional malaise in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: the role of elastase, complement C4a and interleukin-1beta. Unravelling the nature of postexertional malaise in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: the role of elastase, complement C4a and interleukin-1beta.
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Newbury Park, Calif. ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Journal of internal medicine. - Newbury Park, Calif., 1989, currens
Volume/pages
267(2010) :4 , p. 418-435
ISSN
0954-6820
1365-2796
ISI
000275518600009
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Too vigorous exercise or activity increase frequently triggers postexertional malaise in people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), a primary characteristic evident in up to 95% of people with ME/CFS. The present study aimed at examining whether two different types of exercise results in changes in health status, circulating elastase activity, interleukin (IL)-1beta and complement C4a levels. DESIGN: Comparative experimental design. SETTING: University. SUBJECTS: Twenty-two women with ME/CFS and 22 healthy sedentary controls Interventions: participants were subjected to a submaximal exercise (day 8) and a self-paced, physiologically limited exercise (day 16). Each bout of exercise was preceded and followed by blood sampling, actigraphy and assessment of their health status. RESULTS: Both submaximal exercise and self-paced, physiologically limited exercise resulted in postexertional malaise in people with ME/CFS. However, neither exercise bout altered elastase activity, IL-1beta or complement C4a split product levels in people with ME/CFS or healthy sedentary control subjects (P > 0.05). Postexercise complement C4a level was identified as a clinically important biomarker for postexertional malaise in people with ME/CFS. CONCLUSIONS: Submaximal exercise as well as self-paced, physiologically limited exercise triggers postexertional malaise in people with ME/CFS, but neither types of exercise alter acute circulating levels of IL-1beta, complement C4a split product or elastase activity. Further studying of immune alterations in relation to postexertional malaise in people with ME/CFS using multiple measurement points postexercise is required.
E-info
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