Publication
Title
Philosophy versus literature? Against the discontinuity thesis
Author
Abstract
According to what I call the Discontinuity Thesis,' literature can never count as genuine philosophizing: there is an impermeable barrier separating it from philosophy. While philosophy presents logically valid arguments in favor of or against precisely formulated statements, literature gives neither precisely formulated theses nor arguments in favor of or against them. Hence, philosophers do not lose out on anything if they do not read literature. There are two obvious ways of questioning the Discontinuity Thesis: first, arguing that literature can indeed do what philosophy is generally taken to do, and, second, arguing that philosophy is not, in fact, the presentation of logically valid arguments in favor of or against precisely formulated statementswhat it does is closer to what literature is generally taken to do. I use a combination of these two strategies to argue that philosophy is not as intellectually straightforward as it is advertised to be, and literature is not as intellectually impoverished as it is generally taken to be.
Language
English
Source (journal)
The journal of aesthetics and art criticism / American Society for Aesthetics. - Philadelphia, Pa
Publication
Philadelphia, Pa : 2013
ISSN
0021-8529
Volume/pages
71:4(2013), p. 349-360
ISI
000326401100004
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (publisher's version - intranet only)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Art 
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 16.12.2013
Last edited 17.08.2017
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