Title
Influence of viscoelasticity on drop deformation and orientation in shear flow : part 1, stationary states Influence of viscoelasticity on drop deformation and orientation in shear flow : part 1, stationary states
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Applied Engineering Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Amsterdam ,
Subject
Engineering sciences. Technology
Source (journal)
Journal of non-Newtonian fluid mechanics. - Amsterdam
Volume/pages
156(2009) :1-2 , p. 29-43
ISSN
0377-0257
ISI
000263008600004
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Abstract
The influence of matrix and droplet viscoelasticity on the steady deformation and orientation of a single droplet subjected to simple shear is investigated microscopically. Experimental data are obtained in the velocityvorticity and velocityvelocity gradient plane. A constant viscosity Boger fluid is used, as well as a shear-thinning viscoelastic fluid. These materials are described by means of an Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, Ellis, or multi-mode Giesekus constitutive equation. The drop-to-matrix viscosity ratio is 1.5. The numerical simulations in 3D are performed with a volume-of-fluid algorithm and focus on capillary numbers 0.15 and 0.35. In the case of a viscoelastic matrix, viscoelastic stress fields, computed at varying Deborah numbers, show maxima slightly above the drop tip at the back and below the tip at the front. At both capillary numbers, the simulations with the Oldroyd-B constitutive equation predict the experimentally observed phenomena that matrix viscoelasticity significantly suppresses droplet deformation and promotes droplet orientation. These two effects saturate experimentally at high Deborah numbers. Experimentally, the high Deborah numbers are achieved by decreasing the droplet radius with other parameters unchanged. At the higher capillary and Deborah numbers, the use of the Giesekus model with a small amount of shear-thinning dampens the stationary state deformation slightly and increases the angle of orientation. Droplet viscoelasticity on the other hand hardly affects the steady droplet deformation and orientation, both experimentally and numerically, even at moderate to high capillary and Deborah numbers.
E-info
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