Title
Banning nonessential antibiotic uses in food animals is intended to reduce pools of resistance genes : restricting antimicrobial use in food animals : lessons from Europe Banning nonessential antibiotic uses in food animals is intended to reduce pools of resistance genes : restricting antimicrobial use in food animals : lessons from Europe
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Washington, D.C. ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Microbe / American Society for Microbiology. - Washington, D.C.
Volume/pages
6(2011) , p. 274-279
ISSN
1558-7452
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
The first ban on farm use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) was enacted in 1986 in Sweden. Studies from several decades ago established that nontherapeutic use of antibiotics selects for resistance, resistance in humans is determined by the same mechanism as in animals, and resistance genes can disseminate via the food chain into the intestinal flora of humans. Farm use of AGPs increases selection pressure and fosters the dissemination of resistance. A major goal of the European ban on AGPs is to reduce antibiotic resistance traits in the microbial flora of farm animals.
E-info
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/iruaauth/a6a5d4/82a51b7a5bc.pdf
Handle