Title
Steeper declines in forest photosynthesis than respiration explain age-driven decreases in forest growth Steeper declines in forest photosynthesis than respiration explain age-driven decreases in forest growth
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Sciences. Biology
Publication type
article
Publication
Washington, D.C. ,
Subject
Engineering sciences. Technology
Source (journal)
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. - Washington, D.C.
Volume/pages
111(2014) :24 , p. 8856-8860
ISSN
0027-8424
ISI
000337300100042
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
The traditional view of forest dynamics originated by Kira and Shidei [Kira T, Shidei T (1967) Jap J Ecol 17: 70-87] and Odum [Odum EP (1969) Science 164(3877): 262-270] suggests a decline in net primary productivity (NPP) in aging forests due to stabilized gross primary productivity (GPP) and continuously increased autotrophic respiration (R-a). The validity of these trends in GPP and Ra is, however, very difficult to test because of the lack of long-term ecosystem-scale field observations of both GPP and Ra. Ryan and colleagues [Ryan MG, Binkley D, Fownes JH (1997) Ad Ecol Res 27: 213-262] have proposed an alternative hypothesis drawn from site-specific results that aboveground respiration and below-ground allocation decreased in aging forests. Here, we analyzed data from a recently assembled global database of carbon fluxes and show that the classical view of the mechanisms underlying the age-driven decline in forest NPP is incorrect and thus support Ryan's alternative hypothesis. Our results substantiate the age-driven decline in NPP, but in contrast to the traditional view, both GPP and R-a decline in aging boreal and temperate forests. We find that the decline in NPP in aging forests is primarily driven by GPP, which decreases more rapidly with increasing age than R-a does, but the ratio of NPP/GPP remains approximately constant within a biome. Our analytical models describing forest succession suggest that dynamic forest ecosystem models that follow the traditional paradigm need to be revisited.
E-info
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/iruaauth/684c63/9957855.pdf
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