Title
Improving facility performance in infectious disease care in Uganda : a mixed design study with pre/post and cluster randomized trial componentsImproving facility performance in infectious disease care in Uganda : a mixed design study with pre/post and cluster randomized trial components
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Research group
Epidemiology and social medicine (ESOC)
Publication type
article
Publication
Subject
Engineering sciences. Technology
Source (journal)
PLoS ONE
Volume/pages
9(2014):8, 16 p.
ISSN
1932-6203
1932-6203
Article Reference
e103017
Carrier
E-only publicatie
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Background: The effects of two interventions, Integrated Management of Infectious Disease (IMID) training program and On-Site Support (OSS), were tested on 23 facility performance indicators for emergency triage assessment and treatment (ETAT), malaria, pneumonia, tuberculosis, and HIV. Methods: The trial was implemented in 36 primary care facilities in Uganda. From April 2010, two mid-level practitioners per facility participated in IMID training. Eighteen of 36 facilities were randomly assigned to Arm A, and received OSS in 2010 (nine monthly two-day sessions); 18 facilities assigned to Arm B did not receive OSS in 2010. Data were collected from Nov 2009 to Dec 2010 using a revised Ministry of Health outpatient medical form and nine registers. We analyzed the effect of IMID training alone by measuring changes before and during IMID training in Arm B, the combined effect of IMID training and OSS by measuring changes in Arm A, and the incremental effect of OSS by comparing changes across Arms A and B. Results: IMID training was associated with statistically significant improvement in three indicators: outpatients triaged (adjusted relative risks (aRR) = 1.29, 99% CI = 1.01,1.64), emergency and priority patients admitted, detained, or referred (aRR = 1.59, 99% CI = 1.04,2.44), and pneumonia suspects assessed (aRR = 2.31, 99% CI = 1.50,3.55). IMID training and OSS combined was associated with improvements in six indicators: three ETAT indicators (outpatients triaged (aRR = 2.03, 99% CI = 1.13,3.64), emergency and priority patients admitted, detained or referred (aRR = 3.03, 99% CI = 1.40,6.56), and emergency patients receiving at least one appropriate treatment (aRR = 1.77, 99% CI = 1.10,2.84)); two malaria indicators (malaria cases receiving appropriate antimalarial (aRR = 1.50, 99% CI = 1.04,2.17), and patients with negative malaria test results prescribed antimalarial (aRR = 0.67, 99% CI = 0.46,0.97)); and enrollment in HIV care (aRR = 1.58, 99% CI = 1.32,1.89). OSS was associated with incremental improvement in emergency patients receiving at least one appropriate treatment (adjusted ratio of RR = 1.84,99% CI = 1.09,3.12). Conclusion: The trial showed that the OSS intervention significantly improved performance in one of 23 facility indicators.
E-info
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Full text (open access)
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/irua/d6691b/119301.pdf
Handle