Title
Oxidative metabolism of BDE-99 by human liver microsomes : predominant role of CYP2B6 Oxidative metabolism of BDE-99 by human liver microsomes : predominant role of CYP2B6
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences. Pharmacy
Publication type
article
Publication
Orlando, Fla ,
Subject
Chemistry
Biology
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Toxicological sciences. - Orlando, Fla
Volume/pages
129(2012) :2 , p. 280-292
ISSN
1096-6080
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Abstract
Hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been found in human serum, suggesting that they are formed by in vivo oxidative metabolism of PBDEs. However, the biotransformation of 2,2′,4,4′,5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99), a major PBDE detected in human tissue and environmental samples, is poorly understood. In the present study, the oxidative metabolism of BDE-99 was assessed using pooled and single-donor human liver microsomes, a panel of human recombinant cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, and CYP-specific antibodies. Hydroxylated metabolites were quantified using a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometrybased method. In total, 10 hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-99 were produced by human liver microsomes. Six metabolites were identified as 2,4,5-tribromophenol (2,4,5-TBP), 4-OH-BDE-90, 5′-OH-BDE-99, 6′-OH-BDE-99, 4′-OH-BDE-101, and 2-OH-BDE-123 using authentic standards. Three monohydroxy- and one dihydroxy-pentabrominated metabolites were unidentified. Rates of formation of the three major metabolites (2,4,5-TBP, 5′-OH-BDE-99, and 4′-OH-BDE-101) by human liver microsomes ranged from 24.4 to 44.8 pmol/min/mg protein. Additional experiments demonstrated that the dihydroxylated metabolite was a primary metabolite of BDE-99 and was not produced by hydroxylation of a monohydroxy metabolite. Among the panel of recombinant CYP enzymes tested, formation of all 10 hydroxylated metabolites was catalyzed solely by CYP2B6. A combined approach using antibodies to CYP2B6 and single-donor liver microsomes expressing a wide range of CYP2B6 levels confirmed that CYP2B6 was responsible for the biotransformation of BDE-99. Collectively, the results show that the oxidative metabolism of BDE-99 by human liver microsomes is catalyzed solely by CYP2B6 and is an important determinant of the toxicity and bioaccumulation of BDE-99 in humans.
E-info
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/iruaauth/d14d87/2d022bbfe5e.pdf