Title
Adherence to phosphate binders in hemodialysis patients : prevalence and determinantsAdherence to phosphate binders in hemodialysis patients : prevalence and determinants
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Research group
Centre for Research and Innovation in Care (CRIC)
Publication type
article
Publication
Milano,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Journal of nephrology. - Milano
Volume/pages
27(2014):6, p. 673-679
ISSN
1121-8428
ISI
000345396800010
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Background Phosphate control is a crucial treatment goal in end-stage renal disease, but poor patient adherence to phosphate binder therapy remains a challenge. This study aimed to estimate the extent of phosphate binder adherence in hemodialysis patients and to identify potential determinants. Methods Phosphate binder adherence was measured blindly in 135 hemodialysis patients for 2 months using the medication event monitoring system. Patient data, gathered at inclusion through medical records, ad hoc questionnaires and the short form (SF)-36 health survey, included: (1) demographics, (2) perceived side-effects, belief in benefit, self-reported adherence to the therapy, (3) knowledge about phosphate binder therapy, (4) social support, and (5) quality of life (SF-36). Phosphatemia data was collected from charts. Being adherent was defined as missing <1 total daily dose/week and being totally adherent as missing <1 total daily dose/week, every week. Results Mean age of patients was 67 years and 64 % of the sample was male. Over the 2 months, 78 % of the prescribed doses were taken. Every week, about half of patients were adherent. Over the entire 8-week period, 22 % of patients were totally adherent. Mean phosphatemia levels were 0.55 mg/dl lower in adherent than nonadherent patients (4.76 vs. 5.31 mg/dl). Determinants for being totally adherent were living with a partner, higher social support (both were interrelated) and higher physical quality of life. Experiencing intake-related inconvenience negatively affected adherence. The social support and quality of life physical score explained 26 % of the variance in adherence. Conclusions Phosphate binder nonadherence remains a major problem. Interventions should aim, at least, to improve social support. With few associated factors found and yet low adherence, an individualized approach seems indicated.
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