Title
Evidence that gonadotropin-releasing hormone II is not a physiological regulator of gonadotropin secretion in mammals
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences . Biomedical Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Oxford ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Journal of neuroendocrinology. - Oxford
Volume/pages
15(2003) :9 , p. 831-839
ISSN
0953-8194
ISI
000184574300003
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Abstract
Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-II stimulates luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion when administered at high doses in mammals, and this effect has been assumed to be mediated through the GnRH-II receptor expressed on gonadotropes. This study used two selective GnRH-I receptor antagonists to test the alternative hypothesis that GnRH-II acts through the GnRH-I receptor to elicit gonadotropin secretion. The antagonist, antide, was used to characterize the receptor-relay because it was a pure antagonist in vitro based on inositol phosphate responses in COS-7 cells transfected with either mammalian GnRH-I and GnRH-II receptors and, in vivo , potently antagonized the gonadotropin-releasing effect of a single injection of 250 ng GnRH-I in our sexually inactive sheep model. In a series of studies in sheep, antide (i) blocked the acute LH response to a single injection of GnRH-II (20 mug antide: 10 mug GnRH-II); (ii) blocked both the acute, pulsatile LH response and the FSH priming response to 2-hourly injections of GnRH-II over 36 h (100 mug antide/8 h: 4 mug GnRH-II/2 h); and (iii) chronically blocked both the pulsatile LH response and the marked FSH priming response to 4-hourly injections of GnRH-II over 10 days (75 mug antide/8 h: 4 mug GnRH-II/4 h). In two final experiments, the GnRH-I antagonist 135-18, shown previously to agonize the mammalian GnRH-II receptor, blocked the gonadotropin-releasing effects of GnRH-I (250 ng) but failed to elicit an LH response when given alone, and simultaneous administration of GnRH-II (250 ng) failed to alter the LH-releasing effect of GnRH-I (50-500 ng). These data thus support our hypothesis. Based on additional literature, it is unlikely that the GnRH-II decapeptide is a native regulator of the gonadotrope in mammals.
E-info
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/iruaauth/ce605c/6459073.pdf
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