Title
Ticlopidine and clopidogrel, sometimes combined with aspirin, only minimally increase the surgical risk in renal transplantation : a case-control study
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Berlin ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation. - Berlin
Volume/pages
29(2014) :2 , p. 463-466
ISSN
0931-0509
ISI
000331404100033
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Abstract
Background. Patients undergoing kidney transplantation are sometimes being treated with antiplatelet agents such as ticlopidine or clopidogrel. Some teams refuse to wait-list these patients for fear of bleeding during transplant surgery. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 702 adult patients with a kidney transplant alone between 2000 and 2010. Nineteen (2.7%) patients were taking clopidogrel or ticlopidine when called in for transplantation. Furthermore, 10 of these 19 patients were also taking low-dose aspirin (ASA). We compared the risk of bleeding peri-and postoperatively, and the occurrence of cardiovascular complications within 30 days after renal transplantation between 19 cases and 39 controls randomly selected within the cohort. Results. Platelets were administered to 7 cases (37%) versus 0 controls (P < 0.001). A single case (5.3%) presented with significant bleeding during surgery following an implantation biopsy, and required 4 red bood cell (RBC) units. During the first day, 3 of the 19 cases (16%) and 1 of the 39 controls required RBC (P = 0.1). No reoperation was performed for bleeding. After the transplant, clopidogrel or ticlopidine was resumed in only two patients. The platelet count and haemoglobin were similar between cases and controls at Day 30. No cardiovascular event occurred in cases or controls during the first month post-transplantation. At 5 years, graft and patient survival was similar in cases and controls. Conclusions. Clopidogrel and ticlopidine, sometimes in combination with ASA, are associated with a low risk of bleeding during renal transplantation and does not seem to be a contraindication for renal transplant surgery.
Full text (open access)
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/irua/03f8f0/9004.pdf
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