Title
Quality of resuscitation by first responders using the 'public access resuscitator': a randomized manikin studyQuality of resuscitation by first responders using the 'public access resuscitator': a randomized manikin study
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Research group
Antwerp Surgical Training, Anatomy and Research Centre (ASTARC)
Publication type
article
Publication
London,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
European journal of emergency medicine. - London
Volume/pages
21(2014):6, p. 409-417
ISSN
0969-9546
ISI
000344787600004
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Aim The CAREvent Public Access Resuscitator (PAR) is an electronic, oxygen-driven cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) device allowing volume-controlled ventilation with a face mask and guiding the rescuer through the resuscitation with voice prompts and visual indications. We hypothesized that 1 year after initial training, the efficacy of ventilation skills (primary outcome) and compression skills (secondary outcome) by first responders using the PAR would be superior compared with CPR with only a face mask. Methods Seventy-one first responders were randomized to a group using the PAR (n= 35) and a control group using only a face mask (n= 36). CPR skills were assessed immediately after training and after 3, 7 and 12 months using a Skill Reporter manikin. Differences between groups over time and the interaction between time and groups were assessed using repeated measures models. Results are reported as mean values and number of participants with good ventilation or compression skills. Results Twelve months after training, there were more PAR users with adequate tidal volume than face mask users. Other ventilations skills did not differ between groups. There were more PAR users with an adequate number of compressions and with good hand position. Skill decay over 12 months did not differ between groups, except for hand position, where no decline was observed in the PAR group. Conclusion Compared with the face mask, PAR improved tidal volume, compressions per minute and hand position in a manikin setting. (c) 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
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