Title
Vestibular migraine in an otolaryngology clinic : prevalence, associated symptoms, and prophylactic medication effectivenessVestibular migraine in an otolaryngology clinic : prevalence, associated symptoms, and prophylactic medication effectiveness
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Sciences. Physics
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Research group
Biophysics and Biomedical Physics
Translational Neurosciences (TNW)
Faculteit Geneeskunde
Publication type
article
Publication
Philadelphia, Pa.,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Otology and neurotology. - Philadelphia, Pa.
Volume/pages
36(2015):1, p. 133-138
ISSN
1531-7129
ISI
000346368200027
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Objective: To assess the prevalence of vestibular migraine (VM) in patients consulting to an otolaryngology clinic, the neurootological associated symptoms, and the effect of prophylactic antimigrainous medication on VM symptom improvement. Study Design: Retrospective chart review. Setting: Tertiary referral otolaryngology clinic. Subjects and Methods: We used the diagnostic criteria from the Barany Society and the International Headache Society to allocate patients to a subgroup: VM, possible VM, and atypical VM. Main Outcome Measure: The prevalence of VM, percentages of associated neurotological symptoms, and percentages of effectiveness of prophylactic medication. Results: Sixty-five (16%) patients were selected from the total patient population (n = 407) from which 4.2% were assigned to the definite VM group, 5.7% to the probable VM group, and 6.1% to the atypical VM group. We found a significantly different distribution between the groups for photophobia (p = 0.035), ear pressure (p = 0.023), and scotoma (p = 0.015). Thirty patients were administered with flunarizine and 68% responded with an improvement in VM symptoms (p < 0.001). For propranolol, 31 patients were treated and there was an improvement of symptoms in 73% (p<0.001), Remarkable was the fact that these percentages were not significantly different between the subgroups. Conclusion: VM is a common disorder presenting in a dizziness clinic, and detailed history taking is important to assess VM-associated symptoms and thus to prevent underdiaposis. The latter is very important because our study shows that the majority of patients, regardless of VM subtype, can benefit from a prophylactic treatment, but further prospective studies are necessary.
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