Publication
Title
Influence of arterial occlusion on outcome after intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke
Author
Abstract
Background and Purpose-We aimed to assess the interaction between intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) and arterial occlusion on acute cervicocerebral computed tomographic angiography on the outcome of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods-Patients from the Acute Stroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne (ASTRAL) registry with onset-to-door-time <= 4 hours, acute cervicocerebral computed tomographic angiography, a premorbid modified Rankin Scale <= 2, and a National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) >4 were selected. Patients with significant intracranial arterial obstruction (<= 50%-99%) and undergoing acute endovascular treatment were excluded. An interaction analysis of IVT and initial arterial occlusion for favorable 3 months outcome (modified Rankin Scale <3) were performed with adjustment for potential confounders. Results-Among 654 included patients, 382 (58%) showed arterial occlusion, of whom 263 (69%) received IVT. Two hundred seventy-two showed no/minimal obstruction of whom 139 (51%) received IVT. In the adjusted interaction analysis, there was a trend in favor of the arterial occlusion group (odds ratio [OR]=3.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-18.97; P=0.08). IVT (versus no IVT) was associated with better outcome in patients with occlusion (adjusted OR for favorable outcome, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.10-8.28) but not in patients with no/minimal obstruction (OR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.21-2.74). Conversely, patients with occlusion had a similar rate of favorable outcome as no/minimal obstruction when thrombolysed (OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.17-1.47) but had a less favorable outcome without thrombolysis (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.04-0.44). Conclusions-In this retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, there was a trend for more favorable outcomes with IVT in the setting of initial arterial occlusion than in the setting of no/minimal obstruction. Before confirmation in randomized controlled studies, this information should not influence thrombolysis decisions, however.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Stroke: a journal of cerebral circulation / American Heart Association. - New York, N.Y.
Publication
New York, N.Y. : 2015
ISSN
0039-2499
Volume/pages
46:1(2015), p. 126-131
ISI
000346735800035
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
UAntwerpen
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 13.03.2015
Last edited 20.11.2017
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