Title
Prenatal and postnatal exposure to persistent organic pollutants and infant growth : a pooled analysis of seven European birth cohorts Prenatal and postnatal exposure to persistent organic pollutants and infant growth : a pooled analysis of seven European birth cohorts
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences . Biomedical Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Research Triangle Park, N.C. ,
Subject
Chemistry
Biology
Pharmacology. Therapy
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Environmental health perspectives. - Research Triangle Park, N.C., 1972, currens
Volume/pages
123(2015) :7 , p. 730-736
ISSN
0091-6765
ISI
000357297500025
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Background: Infant exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) may contribute to obesity. However, many studies so far have been small, focused on transplacental exposure, used an inappropriate measure to assess postnatal exposure through breastfeeding if any, or did not discern between prenatal and postnatal effects. Methods: We pooled data from 7 European birth cohorts with biomarker concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl 153 (PCB-153) (n=2487), and p,p-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p-DDE) (n=1864), estimating prenatal and postnatal POPs exposure using a validated pharmacokinetic model. Growth was change in weight-for-age z-score between birth and 24 months. Per compound, multi-level models were fitted with either POPs total exposure from conception to 24 months, prenatal or postnatal exposure. Results: We found a significant increase in growth associated with p,p-DDE, seemingly due to prenatal exposure (per interquartile increase in exposure, adjusted β=0.12; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.22). Due to heterogeneity across cohorts, this estimate cannot be considered precise, but does indicate that an association with infant growth is present on average. In contrast, a significant decrease in growth was associated with postnatal PCB-153 exposure (β=-0.10; 95% CI: -0.19, -0.01). Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the largest study to date of POPs exposure and infant growth, and with state of the art exposure modelling. Prenatal p,p-DDE was associated with increased infant growth, and postnatal PCB-153 with decreased growth at European exposure levels.
Full text (open access)
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/irua/0b5135/a66956f2.pdf
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