Title
Neurobehavioral performance in adolescents is inversely associated with traffic exposure Neurobehavioral performance in adolescents is inversely associated with traffic exposure
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences . Biomedical Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Oxford ,
Subject
Biology
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Environment international. - Oxford
Volume/pages
75(2015) , p. 136-143
ISSN
0160-4120
ISI
000348746600013
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
On the basis of animal research and epidemiological studies in children and elderly there is a growing concern that traffic exposure may affect the brain. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between traffic exposure and neurobehavioral performance in adolescents. We examined 606 adolescents. To model the exposure, we constructed a traffic exposure factor based on a biomarker of benzene (urinary trans,trans-muconic acid) and the amount of contact with traffic preceding the neurobehavioral examination (using distance-weighted traffic density and time spent in traffic). We used a Bayesian structural equation model to investigate the association between traffic exposure and three neurobehavioral domains: sustained attention, short-term memory, and manual motor speed. A one standard deviation increase in traffic exposure was associated with a 0.26 standard deviation decrease in sustained attention (95% credible interval: − 0.02 to − 0.51), adjusting for gender, age, smoking, passive smoking, level of education of the mother, socioeconomic status, time of the day, and day of the week. The associations between traffic exposure and the other neurobehavioral domains studied had the same direction but did not reach the level of statistical significance. The results remained consistent in the sensitivity analysis excluding smokers and passive smokers. The inverse association between sustained attention and traffic exposure was independent of the blood lead level. Our study in adolescents supports the recent findings in children and elderly suggesting that traffic exposure adversely affects the neurobehavioral function.
E-info
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