Title
Relating self-reports of writing behaviour and online task execution using a temporal model Relating self-reports of writing behaviour and online task execution using a temporal model
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Applied Economics
Publication type
article
Publication
New York ,
Subject
Psychology
Literature
Source (journal)
Metacognition and learning. - New York
Volume/pages
6(2011) :3 , p. 229-253
ISSN
1556-1623
1556-1631
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Abstract
Current theory about writing states that the quality of (meta)cognitive processing (i.e. planning, text production, revising, et cetera) is, at least partly, determined by the temporal distribution of (meta)cognitive activities across task execution. Put simply, the quality of task execution is determined more by when activities are applied than by how often they are applied. Planning and revising are two extreme writing styles, in which (meta)cognitive activities are temporally differently distributed across the writing process. Planners are writers who generate plans before text production. Revisers use text production as a means to arrive at a content plan. The present study investigates the question whether the online (meta)cognitive processing of secondary school students during writing tasks, as measured by think aloud techniques and keystroke logging, can be predicted by their responses to an offline questionnaire which measures to what degree students considered themselves to be planners and revisers. It was expected that different reported writing styles would entail different temporal distributions of six (meta)cognitive activities: reading the assignment, planning, text production, reading own text, evaluating own text and revising. This hypothesis was partly confirmed. The results show that the online temporal distributions of reading the assignment and planning are different for different degrees of reported writing styles. On the basis of these results, the validity of both the questionnaire and the concept of planner and reviser styles are discussed.
Full text (open access)
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/irua/e4f2a1/2c12bcc0.pdf