Publication
Title
Fire enhances phosphorus availability in topsoils depending on binding properties
Author
Abstract
Fire can have large effects on ecosystems, with phosphorus being highly important in this regard, especially when considering productivity in burned or adjacent ecosystems after fire. Unfortunately, existing data pose contradictions and methodological challenges to assessing P availability. Here, the impact of fire on topsoil available P was estimated using three different types of organic soil layers (raw humus from spruce, humus from beech, and peat) and two fire regimes (obtaining black carbon and ash). Our findings suggest a strong fire impact on P availability, by enhancing available P during burning to black carbon (~10-fold), and to ash (~2- to 7.5-fold) dependent on calcite content. Fire impact on P availability is on a similar order of magnitude as mineral weathering and annual P cycling/uptake in/by ecosystems. Furthermore, the proportion of available P in relation to total P depends on the origin of the organic soil layers. When related to the remaining mass after burning, as is commonly done, P availability can be overestimated by up to 1400%. Results from this study provide a realistic magnitude of shifts in P release and P availability by fire events of different intensity for widely abundant ecosystem conditions. Taking the importance of P for ecosystem processes into account, these results are highly relevant, because fires for fuel reduction are a common application, and for temperate and boreal ecosystems even moderate climate change scenarios predict an increasing appearance of fires in these regions.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Ecology / Ecological Society of America [Washington, D.C.] - Washington, DC, 1920, currens
Publication
Washington, DC : 2015
ISSN
0012-9658 [print]
1939-9170 [online]
Volume/pages
96:6(2015), p. 1598-1606
ISI
000356021700015
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (open access)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
[E?say:metaLocaldata.cgzprojectinf]
The soil systems under global change (SOGLO).
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 10.06.2015
Last edited 29.07.2017
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