Title
Does the antenatal detection of fetal growth restriction (FGR) have a prognostic value for mortality and short-term morbidity for very preterm infants? Results from the MOSAIC cohort Does the antenatal detection of fetal growth restriction (FGR) have a prognostic value for mortality and short-term morbidity for very preterm infants? Results from the MOSAIC cohort
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
New York, N.Y. ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
The journal of maternal-fetal and neonatal medicine. - New York, N.Y., 2005, currens
Volume/pages
29(2016) :4 , p. 596-601
ISSN
1476-7058
ISI
000366743600015
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Objective: We investigated the impact of antenatal diagnosis of fetal growth restriction (FGR) on the risks of mortality and morbidity for very preterm infants given actual birthweight percentiles. Methods: Data on 4608 live born infants 2431 weeks of gestational age (GA) in 10 European regions in 2003 were used to compare in-hospital mortality, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and severe neurological morbidity by birthweight percentiles and antenatal diagnosis of FGR. Other covariates were GA, sex, multiplicity, maternal complications, antenatal corticosteroids, birth in a level III center and region. Results: Sixteen percent (n = 728) of all infants and 72%, 30% and 6%, respectively, of those with birthweight percentiles <10th, 10th24th and ≥25th had an antenatal diagnosis of FGR. After adjustment for clinical factors, antenatal diagnosis of FGR was not associated with mortality for infants with a birthweight ≥10th percentile (OR [95% CI]: 0.9 [0.51.9] and 1.0 [0.61.8] for birthweights between the 10th24th percentile and ≥25th percentile, respectively), but infants with a birthweight <10th percentile had higher mortality (OR [95% CI]: 2.4 [1.05.8]). No association was observed at any birthweight percentile with BPD or severe neurological morbidity. Conclusion: Antenatal diagnosis of FGR did not influence risks of mortality or morbidity when birthweight was ≥10th percentile; however, mortality risk was higher in antenatally detected infants with birthweight below the <10th percentile.
E-info
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/iruaauth/12c12b/a0ee58cd94c.pdf
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