Title
Self-perceived employability, organization-rated potential, and the psychological contract Self-perceived employability, organization-rated potential, and the psychological contract
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Applied Economics
Publication type
article
Publication
,
Subject
Economics
Source (journal)
Journal of managerial psychology. - Place of publication unknown
Volume/pages
29(2014) :5 , p. 565-581
ISSN
0268-3946
ISI
000341929200007
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Abstract
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between self-perceived employability resources and perceived psychological contract (PC) obligations. To examine the extent to which organizational ratings of potential, through their signaling function, might serve as a buffer between employability and PC perceptions that are undesirable from an employer's point of view. Design/methodology/approach Both self-report data (i.e. self-perceived employability resources and perceived PC obligations) and data reported by the HR departments of the participating organizations (i.e. organizational ratings of potential) were collected in a case-control design (n=103). Findings Self-perceived employability resources are not related to lower intentions to stay with one's current employer. High-potential employees did not perceive themselves as particularly obliged to reciprocate their organizations additional investments in them by expressing longer term loyalty, or a higher performance level. Practical implications Organizations should not be hesitant to assist their employees in enhancing their employability resources. In addition, they should engage in deliberate PC building with their high-potential employees so as to align their perceived PC obligations with the organizational agenda. Originality/value The relationship between self-perceived employability resources and perceived PC obligations has been underexamined; hardly any PC research has taken organizational variables into account; hardly any research exists on the psychological implications of being identified as a high potential; and the study draws both on self-report data and data reported by the HR departments of the participating organizations.
E-info
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