Title
In-vitro antimicrobial activity and complement/macrophage stimulating effects of a hot-water extract from mycelium of the oyster mushroom Pleurotus sp. In-vitro antimicrobial activity and complement/macrophage stimulating effects of a hot-water extract from mycelium of the oyster mushroom Pleurotus sp.
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences. Pharmacy
Publication type
article
Publication
Amsterdam ,
Subject
Pharmacology. Therapy
Source (journal)
Innovative food science & emerging technologies. - Amsterdam
Volume/pages
30(2015) , p. 177-183
ISSN
1466-8564
ISI
000359329400022
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
The study examined the in vitro antimicrobial and the complement/macrophage stimulating effects of a hot-water extract from mycelium of the oyster mushroom Pleurotus sp. The extract activated the microbial autolytic system of eight strains: seven autolyzing strains with intensity values (I-S) ranging from 2.7% in Candida sp. to 36.1% in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while autolysis was of 1.8% in one non-autolyzing strain (Bacillus cereus). The activation of the alternative pathway of the complement (APC) was dose and time dependent as judged by the lysis of rabbit red blood cells. Two main polysaccharide fractions of the extract significantly bind human immunoglobulin G (IgG) which could result in activation of the classical pathway of the complement (CPC). The extract (5-100 mu g/well) enhanced the acid phosphatase activity in murine peritoneal macrophages to 133-184% compared to controls. The findings introduce a novel "bifunctional" approach (antimicrobial-immunomodulatory) to the nutraceutical potential of the Pleurotus hot-water mycelial extract. Industrial relevance: At present, between 80% and 85% of all edible-medicinal mushroom products are derived from the fruiting bodies and only 15% are based on extracts from mycelia. The present study suggests that not only Pleurotus mushrooms but also their mycelia may be a good renewable and easily accessible resource for developing functional foods/nutraceuticals or even pharmaceutical agents with antimicrobial and immunomodulatory effects. Additionally, the application of the extract as food bioingredient could represent an innovative strategy for preventing and/or reducing the negative effects of food microbial spoilage. Hence the hot-water extract from mycelia of the oyster mushroom Pleurotus sp. is considerably relevant to the food and pharmaceutical industries. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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