Title
Pasireotide can induce sustained decreases in urinary cortisol and provide clinical benefit in patients with Cushing's disease: results from an open-ended, open-label extension trial Pasireotide can induce sustained decreases in urinary cortisol and provide clinical benefit in patients with Cushing's disease: results from an open-ended, open-label extension trial
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Pituitary. - Place of publication unknown
Volume/pages
18(2015) :5 , p. 604-612
ISSN
1386-341X
ISI
000360887800004
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Report the efficacy and safety of pasireotide sc in patients with Cushing's disease during an open-ended, open-label extension to a randomized, double-blind, 12-month, Phase III study. 162 patients entered the core study. 58 patients who had mean UFC a parts per thousand currency sign ULN at month 12 or were benefiting clinically from pasireotide entered the extension. Patients received the same dose of pasireotide as at the end of the core study (300-1,200 mu g bid). Dose titration was permitted according to efficacy or drug-related adverse events. 40 patients completed 24 months' treatment. Of the patients who entered the extension, 50.0 % (29/58) and 34.5 % (20/58) had controlled UFC (UFC a parts per thousand currency sign ULN) at months 12 and 24, respectively. The mean percentage decrease in UFC was 57.3 % (95 % CI 40.7-73.9; n = 52) and 62.1 % (50.8-73.5; n = 33) after 12 and 24 months' treatment, respectively. Improvements in clinical signs of Cushing's disease were sustained up to month 24. The most frequent drug-related adverse events in patients who received a parts per thousand yen1 dose of pasireotide (n = 162) from core baseline until the 24-month cut-off were diarrhea (55.6 %), nausea (48.1 %), hyperglycemia (38.9 %), and cholelithiasis (31.5 %). No new safety issues were identified during the extension. Reductions in mean UFC and improvements in clinical signs of Cushing's disease were maintained over 24 months of pasireotide treatment. The safety profile of pasireotide is typical for a somatostatin analogue, except for the frequency and degree of hyperglycemia; patients should be monitored for changes in glucose homeostasis. Pasireotide represents the first approved pituitary-targeted treatment for patients with Cushing's disease.
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Full text (open access)
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/irua/c584e4/127833.pdf
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