Publication
Title
Early life experience primes resistance to oxidative stress
Author
Abstract
The extent to which early stress exposure is detrimental to Darwinian fitness may depend on its severity, with mild stress exposure actually having a stimulatory and, possibly, beneficial effect through a hormetic response to the stressful stimulus. We need to understand such hormetic processes to determine how the early environment can help shape a phenotype adapted to the conditions the organism is most likely to experience in its adult environment. Using the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), we tested the hypothesis that individuals exposed to mild heat stress earlier in life will suffer less oxidative stress when faced with high heat stress in adulthood than will individuals either not pre-exposed to heat stress or exposed to high heat stress earlier in life. Our findings demonstrate that early life exposure to mild heat stress primes the system to better withstand oxidative stress when encountering heat stress as an adult. These findings point to a potential mechanism linking early life experiences to future Darwinian fitness.
Language
English
Source (journal)
The journal of experimental biology. - London
Publication
London : 2012
ISSN
0022-0949
Volume/pages
215:16(2012), p. 2820-2826
ISI
000306755700015
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (publisher's version - intranet only)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Publication type
Subject
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 06.10.2015
Last edited 06.07.2017