Systems-level G protein-coupled receptor therapy across a neurodegenerative continuum by the GLP-1 receptor systemSystems-level G protein-coupled receptor therapy across a neurodegenerative continuum by the GLP-1 receptor system
Faculty of Sciences. Biology
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences . Biomedical Sciences
Research group
Molecular Plant Physiology and Biotechnology
VIB DMG - Translational Neurobiology
VIB DMG - Neurodegenerative Brain Diseases Group
Publication type
Lausanne :Frontiers Research Foundation,
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Frontiers in endocrinology. - Lausanne, 2010, currens
5(2014), p. 1-15
Article Reference
E-only publicatie
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
University of Antwerp
With our increasing appreciation of the true complexity of diseases and pathophysiologies, it is clear that this knowledge needs to inform the future development of pharmacotherapeutics. For many disorders, the disease mechanism itself is a complex process spanning multiple signaling networks, tissues, and organ systems. Identifying the precise nature and locations of the pathophysiology is crucial for the creation of systemically effective drugs. Diseases once considered constrained to a limited range of organ systems, e.g., central neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimers disease (AD), Parkinsons disease (PD), and Huntington disease (HD), the role of multiple central and peripheral organ systems in the etiology of such diseases is now widely accepted. With this knowledge, it is increasingly clear that these seemingly distinct neurodegenerative disorders (AD, PD, and HD) possess multiple pathophysiological similarities thereby demonstrating an inter-related continuum of disease-related molecular alterations. With this systems-level appreciation of neurodegenerative diseases, it is now imperative to consider that pharmacotherapeutics should be developed specifically to address the systemic imbalances that create the disorders. Identification of potential systems-level signaling axes may facilitate the generation of therapeutic agents with synergistic remedial activity across multiple tissues, organ systems, and even diseases. Here, we discuss the potentially therapeutic systems-level interaction of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) ligandreceptor axis with multiple aspects of the AD, PD, and HD neurodegenerative continuum.
Full text (open access)