Title
Loss of TBK1 is a frequent cause of frontotemporal dementia in a Belgian cohort Loss of TBK1 is a frequent cause of frontotemporal dementia in a Belgian cohort
Author
Contributor
Baets, Jonathan
et al.
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences . Biomedical Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Minneapolis, Minn ,
Subject
Biology
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Neurology / American Academy of Neurology. - Minneapolis, Minn
Volume/pages
85(2015) :24 , p. 2116-2125
ISSN
0028-3878
ISI
000366461900006
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Objective: To assess the genetic contribution of TBK1, a gene implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and FTD-ALS, in Belgian FTD and ALS patient cohorts containing a significant part of genetically unresolved patients. Methods: We sequenced TBK1 in a hospital-based cohort of 482 unrelated patients with FTD and FTD-ALS and 147 patients with ALS and an extended Belgian FTD-ALS family DR158. We followed up mutation carriers by segregation studies, transcript and protein expression analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Results: We identified 11 patients carrying a loss-of-function (LOF) mutation resulting in an overall mutation frequency of 1.7% (11/629), 1.1% in patients with FTD (5/460), 3.4% in patients with ALS (5/147), and 4.5% in patients with FTD-ALS (1/22). We found 1 LOF mutation, p.Glu643del, in 6 unrelated patients segregating with disease in family DR158. Of 2 mutation carriers, brain and spinal cord was characterized by TDP-43-positive pathology. The LOF mutations including the p.Glu643del mutation led to loss of transcript or protein in blood and brain. Conclusions: TBK1 LOF mutations are the third most frequent cause of clinical FTD in the Belgian clinically based patient cohort, after C9orf72 and GRN, and the second most common cause of clinical ALS after C9orf72. These findings reinforce that FTD and ALS belong to the same disease continuum. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND), which permits downloading and sharing the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.
Full text (open access)
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/irua/adfadb/129013.pdf
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