Title
Sexually antagonistic selection during parental care is not generated by a testosterone-related intralocus sexual conflictinsights from full-sib comparisons Sexually antagonistic selection during parental care is not generated by a testosterone-related intralocus sexual conflictinsights from full-sib comparisons
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Sciences. Biology
Publication type
article
Publication
London :Nature Publishing Group ,
Subject
Biology
Engineering sciences. Technology
Source (journal)
Scientific reports. - London, 2011, currens
Volume/pages
5(2015) , 9 p.
ISSN
2045-2322
2045-2322
Article Reference
17715
Carrier
E-only publicatie
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
The evolution of shared male and female traits can be hampered if selection favours sex-specific optima. However, such genomic conflicts can be resolved when independent male and female mechanisms evolve. The existence, extent and consequences of conflict and/or conflict resolution are currently debated. Endocrinological traits like plasma testosterone (T) are suitable test cases, given their important role in mediating correlated traits, plus their opposing sex-specific fitness effects. We compared full-sibling (brother/sister) captive canaries to test for (1) sexually antagonistic selection characterized by contrasting fitness patterns within pairs of relatives, (2) intersexual genetic correlation of plasma T (h² = 0.41  ±  0.31) and (3) intralocus sexual conflict over T levels featured by distinct sex-specific fitness optima. We found potential for sexually antagonistic selection, since high fledgling mass was reached by either brothers or sisters, but not by both. We report a positive intersexual correlation for T, as a requirement for intralocus sexual conflict. However, high levels of T were associated with increased female and decreased male fitness (fledgling mass), which contrasts our expectations and challenges the hypothesis of intralocus sexual conflict driven by T. We hypothesize that behavioural and physiological trade-offs differ between sexes when raising offspring, driving T levels towards a state of monomorphism.
Full text (open access)
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/irua/01f450/129360.pdf
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