Publication
Title
Disassembling the city : a historical and an epistemological view on the agency of cities
Author
Abstract
Current ideas about the agency of cities are dominated by economists and economic geographers who point to agglomeration economies and the clustering of institutions, if not to creative classes and a tolerant and diverse cultural climate. In this article, such views will be historized and denaturalized. It will be examined how urban agency was fabricated in the late medieval and early modern period, stressing the role of political philosophy and epistemology. First, focusing on guilds and artisanal economic actors, I will describe the coemergence of specific types of skills and knowledge and the urban as a community and body politic. Subsequently, I will argue that the city as an assemblage transformed drastically during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, showing that the transformations concerning both the political and economic identity of guild-based artisans and the city as a specific political community were contingent on specific attitudes and practices related to matter and materiality.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Journal of urban history. - Beverly Hills, Calif., 1974, currens
Publication
Beverly Hills, Calif. : 2016
ISSN
0096-1442 [print]
1552-6771 [online]
Volume/pages
(2016), p. 1-19
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Full text (open access)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Record
Identification
Creation 29.01.2016
Last edited 03.03.2017
To cite this reference