Title
Defining geometrical position information of a thermal camera and object curvatures using thermography Defining geometrical position information of a thermal camera and object curvatures using thermography
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Sciences. Physics
Faculty of Applied Engineering Sciences
Publication type
conferenceObject
Publication
Maastricht :Shaker publishing bv ,
Subject
Physics
Engineering sciences. Technology
Source (journal)
OPTICAL MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES FOR STRUCTURES & SYSTEMS III
Source (book)
6th International Conference on Optical Measurement Techniques for, Structures and Systems III (OPTIMESS2015), APR 08-09, 2015, Univ Antwerp, Univ Antwerp, Antwerp, BELGIUM
Volume/pages
(2016) , p. 233-242
ISI
000373413300023
ISBN - Hoofdstuk
978-90-423-0439-0
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
In non-destructive evaluation, the use of finite element models to evaluate structural behavior and experimental setup optimization can complement with the inspectors measurement experience. With the use of a finite element model, the assumption of a predefined sound area is superfluous. The use of thermography data for finite element model updating delivers the need for correct mapping of the thermal information out of the IR-camera on the correct geometrical coordinates. The mapping will be discussed in this paper. A first problem that occurs is the lens distortion due to lens curvature errors. This results in a geometrical radial offset of the pixel value. A possible solution is to use a geometrical calibration to perform lens curvature corrections. Besides, there is an increasing demand to analyze complex structures with multiple curvatures. This results in distortions of the thermal images as a result from a higher heating of surfaces planar to the heat source with respect to the surfaces perpendicular to it. The same effect occurs when the surfaces emit the absorbed energy to the camera. The investigated solution makes use of the height information from a Time-of-Flight camera in order to correlate the pixel temperatures with correct height information. This height information corresponds to the geometrical profile known from a finite element model. At last the physical displacement between both cameras is discussed. The angular offset between both camera optical centers is measured and the pixel information is translated to one optical center. This paper describes a methodology to map thermal and height data on the geometrical coordinates of a test sample.
E-info
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