Title
Can intestinal phosphate binding or inhibition of hydroxyapatite growth in the vascular wall halt the progression of established aortic calcification in chronic kidney disease? Can intestinal phosphate binding or inhibition of hydroxyapatite growth in the vascular wall halt the progression of established aortic calcification in chronic kidney disease?
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Faculty of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences . Biomedical Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
New York ,
Subject
Biology
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Calcified tissue international. - New York
Volume/pages
99(2016) :5 , p. 525-534
ISSN
0171-967X
ISI
000385162500009
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Vascular calcification significantly contributes to mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Sevelamer and pyrophosphate (PPi) have proven to be effective in preventing vascular calcification, the former by controlling intestinal phosphate absorption, the latter by directly interfering with the hydroxyapatite crystal formation. Since most patients present with established vascular calcification, it is important to evaluate whether these compounds may also halt or reverse the progression of preexisting vascular calcification. CKD and vascular calcification were induced in male Wistar rats by a 0.75 % adenine low protein diet for 4 weeks. Treatment with PPi (30 or 120 µmol/kg/day), sevelamer carbonate (1500 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was started at the time point at which vascular calcification was present and continued for 3 weeks. Hyperphosphatemia and vascular calcification developed prior to treatment. A significant progression of aortic calcification in vehicle-treated rats with CKD was observed over the final 3-week period. Sevelamer treatment significantly reduced further progression of aortic calcification as compared to the vehicle control. No such an effect was seen for either PPi dose. Sevelamer but not PPi treatment resulted in an increase in both osteoblast and osteoid perimeter. Our study shows that sevelamer was able to reduce the progression of moderate to severe preexisting aortic calcification in a CKD rat model. Higher doses of PPi may be required to induce a similar reduction of severe established arterial calcification in this CKD model.
Full text (open access)
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/irua/171f2b/134677.pdf
E-info
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/iruaauth/66e891/134677.pdf
Handle