Title
3D camera assisted fully automated calibration of scanning laser Doppler vibrometers 3D camera assisted fully automated calibration of scanning laser Doppler vibrometers
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Applied Engineering Sciences
Publication type
conferenceObject
Publication
Melville :Amer inst physics ,
Subject
Physics
Engineering sciences. Technology
Source (journal)
AIP conference proceedings / American Institute of Physics. - New York
Source (book)
12th International A.I.VE.LA. Conference on Vibration Measurements by Laser and Noncontact Techniques, 29 June-1 July 2016, Ancona, Italy
Volume/pages
1740(2016) , 9 p.
ISSN
0094-243X
ISBN - Hoofdstuk
978-0-7354-1397-9
Article Reference
090001
ISBN
978-0-7354-1397-9
ISI
000380817900034
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Scanning laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV) are used to measure full-field vibration shapes of products and structures. In most commercially available scanning laser Doppler vibrometer systems the user manually draws a grid of measurement locations on a 21) camera image of the product. The determination of the correct physical measurement locations can he a time consuming and difficult task. In this paper we present a new methodology for product testing and quality control that integrates 3D imaging techniques with vibration measurements. This procedure allows to test prototypes in a shorter period because physical measurements locations will be located automatically. The proposed methodology uses a 3D time-of-flight camera to measure the location and orientation of the test-object. The 3D image of the time-of-flight camera is then matched with the 3D-CAD model of the object in which measurement locations are pre-defined. A time of flight camera operates strictly in the near infrared spectrum. To improve the signal to noise ratio in the time-of-flight measurement, a time-of-flight camera uses a band filter. As a result of this filter, the laser spot of most laser vibrometers is invisible in the time-of-flight image. Therefore a 21) RGB-camera is used to find the laser-spot of the vibrometer. The laser spot is matched to the 31) image obtained by the time-of-flight camera. Next an automatic calibration procedure is used to aim the laser at the (pre)defined locations. Another benefit from this methodology is that it incorporates automatic mapping between a CAD model and the vibration measurements. This mapping can be used to visualize measurements directly on a 31) CAD model. Secondly the orientation of the CAD model is known with respect to the laser beam. This information can be used to find the direction of the measured vibration relatively to the surface of the object. With this direction, the vibration measurements can be compared more precisely with numerical experiments.
Full text (open access)
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/irua/28b969/134755.pdf
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