Title
Does multi-modal cervical physical therapy improve tinnitus in patients with cervicogenic somatic tinnitus? Does multi-modal cervical physical therapy improve tinnitus in patients with cervicogenic somatic tinnitus?
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Sciences. Biology
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Edinburgh ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Manual therapy / Manipulation Association of Chartered Physiotherapists. - Edinburgh
Volume/pages
26(2016) , p. 125-131
ISSN
1356-689X
ISI
000386601600019
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Background Tinnitus can be related to many different aetiologies such as hearing loss or a noise trauma, but it can also be related to the somatosensory system of the cervical spine, called cervicogenic somatic tinnitus (CST). Case studies suggest a positive effect of cervical spine treatment on tinnitus complaints in patients with CST, but no experimental studies are available. Objective To investigate the effect of a multimodal cervical physical therapy treatment on tinnitus complaints in patients with CST. Design Randomized controlled trial. Patients Patients with a combination of severe subjective tinnitus (Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI): 2590 points) and neck complaints (Neck Bournemouth Questionnaire (NBQ) > 14 points). Intervention All patients received cervical physical therapy for 6 weeks (12 sessions). Patients were randomized in an immediate-start therapy group (n = 19) and a 6-week delayed-start therapy group (n = 19). Measurements TFI and NBQ-scores were documented at baseline, after the wait-and-see period in the delayed-start group, after treatment and after 6 weeks follow-up. The Global Perceived Effect (GPE) was documented at all measuring moments, except at baseline. Results In all patients (n = 38) TFI and NBQ-scores decreased significantly after treatment (p = 0.04 and p < 0.001). NBQ-scores remained significantly lower after follow-up (p = 0.001). Immediately after treatment, 53% (n = 38) experienced substantial improvement of tinnitus. This effect was maintained in 24% of patients after follow-up at six weeks. Conclusion Cervical physical therapy can have a positive effect on subjective tinnitus complaints in patients with a combination of tinnitus and neck complaints. Larger studies, using more responsive outcome measures, are however necessary to prove this effect.
E-info
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/iruaauth/dcbb09/135106.pdf
Full text (open access)
https://repository.uantwerpen.be/docman/irua/f037af/135106.pdf
Handle