Title
The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project : methodology and validation used in the development of proposals for revision of the stage classification of NSCLC in the forthcoming (eighth) edition of the TNM classification of lung cancer The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project : methodology and validation used in the development of proposals for revision of the stage classification of NSCLC in the forthcoming (eighth) edition of the TNM classification of lung cancer
Author
Contributor
van Meerbeeck, Jan P.
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Publication type
article
Publication
Hagerstown, Md :Lippincott Williams & Wilkins ,
Subject
Human medicine
Source (journal)
Journal of thoracic oncology / International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer [Aurora, Colo.] - Hagerstown, Md, 2006, currens
Volume/pages
11(2016) :9 , p. 1433-1446
ISSN
1556-0864
1556-1380
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Full text (Publishers DOI)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
Introduction Stage classification provides a consistent language to describe the anatomic extent of disease and is therefore a critical tool in caring for patients. The Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer developed proposals for revision of the classification of lung cancer for the eighth edition of the tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM) classification, which takes effect in 2017. Methods An international database of 94,708 patients with lung cancer diagnosed in 19992010 was assembled. This article describes the process and statistical methods used to refine the lung cancer stage classification. Results Extensive analysis allowed definition of tumor, node, and metastasis categories and stage groupings that demonstrated consistent discrimination overall and within multiple different patient cohorts (e.g., clinical or pathologic stage, R0 or R-any resection status, geographic region). Additional analyses provided evidence of applicability over time, across a spectrum of geographic regions, histologic types, evaluative approaches, and follow-up intervals. Conclusions An extensive analysis has produced stage classification proposals for lung cancer with a robust degree of discriminatory consistency and general applicability. Nevertheless, external validation is encouraged to identify areas of strength and weakness; a sound validation should have discriminatory ability and be based on an independent data set of adequate size and sufficient follow-up with enough patients for each subgroup.
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