Publication
Title
Characterizing human decellularized crystalline lens capsules as a scaffold for corneal endothelial tissue engineering
Author
Abstract
The idea of transplanting a sheet of laboratory-grown corneal endothelium dates back to 1978; however, the ideal scaffold is still lacking. We hypothesized that human crystalline lens capsules (LCs) could qualify as a scaffold and aimed to characterize the properties of this material for endothelial tissue engineering. LCs were isolated from donor eyes, stored at -80 degrees C, and decellularized with water and trypsin-EDTA. The decellularization was investigated by nuclear staining and counting and the capsule thickness was determined by optical coherence tomography and compared with Descemet's membrane (DM). Transparency was examined by spectrometry, and collagenase degradation was performed to evaluate its resistance to degradation. Cell-scaffold interaction was assessed by measuring focal adhesions surface area on LC and plastic. Finally, primary corneal endothelial cells were grown on LCs to validate the phenotype. Trypsin-EDTA decellularized most effectively, removing 99% of cells. The mean LC thickness was 35.76 +/- 0.43 mu m, whereas DM measured 25.93 +/- 0.26 mu m (p<.0001). Light transmission was 90% for both LC and DM. On a collagenase challenge, LC and amniotic membrane were digested after 13hr, whereas DM was digested after 17hr. The surface area of focal adhesions for cells grown on coated LCs was at least double that compared with other conditions, whereas tight junctions, ion pumps, and hexagonal morphology were well maintained when endothelial cells were cultured on LCs. In conclusion, LCs demonstrate excellent scaffolding properties for tissue engineering and sustain the cell phenotype and can be considered a suitable substrate for ocular tissue engineering or as a template for future scaffolds.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Journal of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. - Place of publication unknown
Publication
Place of publication unknown : 2018
ISSN
1932-6254
Volume/pages
12 :4 (2018) , p. E2020-E2028
ISI
000430395400016
Pubmed ID
29430874
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 04.05.2018
Last edited 19.10.2021
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