Publication
Title
DNA adduct profiling of in vitro colonic meat digests to map red vs. white meat genotoxicity
Author
Abstract
The consumption of red meat has been linked to an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. One of the major hypotheses states that heme iron (present in red meat) stimulates the formation of genotoxic N-nitroso compounds (NOCs) and lipid peroxidation products (LPOs). By means of DNA adductomics, chemically induced DNA adduct formation can be mapped in relation to e.g. dietary exposures. In this study, this state-of-the-art methodology was used to investigate alkylation and (lipid per)oxidation induced DNA adduct formation in in vitro red vs. white meat digests. In doing so, 90 alkylation and (lipid per)oxidation induced DNA adduct types could be (tentatively) identified. Overall, 12 NOC- and/or LPO-related DNA adduct types, i.e. dimethyl-T (or ethyl-T), hydroxymethyl-T, tetramethyl-T, methylguanine (MeG), guanidinohydantoin, hydroxybutyl-C, hydroxymethylhydantoin, malondialdehyde-x3-C, O-6-carboxymethylguanine, hydroxyethyl-T, carboxyethyl-T and 3,N-4-etheno-C were singled out as potential heme-rich meat digestion markers. The retrieval of these DNA adduct markets is in support of the heme, NOC and LPO hypotheses, suggesting that DNA adduct formation may indeed contribute to red meat related CRC risk.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Food and chemical toxicology. - Oxford
Publication
Oxford : 2018
ISSN
0278-6915
Volume/pages
115 (2018) , p. 73-87
ISI
000432644400009
Pubmed ID
29458163
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (open access)
Full text (publisher's version - intranet only)
UAntwerpen
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 02.08.2018
Last edited 26.09.2021
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