Publication
Title
The environmental controls that govern the end product of bacterial nitrate respiration
Author
Abstract
In the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, microbial respiration processes compete for nitrate as an electron acceptor. Denitrification converts nitrate into nitrogenous gas and thus removes fixed nitrogen from the biosphere, whereas ammonification converts nitrate into ammonium, which is directly reusable by primary producers. We combined multiple parallel long-term incubations of marine microbial nitrate-respiring communities with isotope labeling and metagenomics to unravel how specific environmental conditions select for either process. Microbial generation time, supply of nitrite relative to nitrate, and the carbon/nitrogen ratio were identified as key environmental controls that determine whether nitrite will be reduced to nitrogenous gas or ammonium. Our results define the microbial ecophysiology of a biogeochemical feedback loop that is key to global change, eutrophication, and wastewater treatment.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Science / American Association for the Advancement of Science [Washington, D.C.] - Washington, D.C.
Publication
Washington, D.C. : 2014
ISSN
0036-8075
1095-9203
Volume/pages
345 :6197 (2014) , p. 676-679
ISI
000339962800040
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (publisher's version - intranet only)
UAntwerpen
Project info
SEDBIOGEOCHEM 2.0: Hardwiring the ocean floor: the impact of microbial electrical circuitry on biogeochemical cycling in marine sediments
MASEM: Making Sense of Metagenomes
Publication type
Subject
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 08.10.2018
Last edited 03.09.2021