Publication
Title
Combining the benefits of tele-rehabilitation and virtual reality-based balance training : a systematic review on feasibility and effectiveness
Author
Abstract
Purpose: A motivational surrounding is desirable in stroke rehabilitation considering the need to train repetitively to improve balance, even after discharge from rehabilitation facilities. This review aims to investigate whether it is feasible to combine virtual reality (VR) which allows exercising in game-like environments with tele-rehabilitation in a community-dwelling stroke population. Methods: Literature searches were conducted in five databases, for example, PubMed and the Cochrane Library. Randomized controlled trial (RCT) and non-RCT investigating feasibility and effectiveness of VR-based tele-rehabilitation were included. Based on the risk of bias and study design, methodological quality is ranked according to the GRADE guidelines. Results: Seven studies (n = 120) were included, of which four are RCTs. Evidence regarding therapy adherence and perceived enjoyment of VR, as well as a costbenefit of tele-rehabilitation emphasizes feasibility. Equal effects are reported comparing this approach to a therapist-supervised intervention in the clinical setting on balance and functional mobility. Conclusions: Tele-rehabilitation could be a promising tool to overcome burdens that restrict accessibility to rehabilitation in the future. VR can increase motivation allowing longer and more training sessions in community-dwelling stroke survivors. Therefore, combining the benefits of both approaches seems convenient. Although evidence is still sparse, functional improvements seem to be equal compared to a similar intervention with therapist-supervision in the clinic, suggesting that for cost-efficient rehabilitation parts of therapy can be transferred to the homes. Implications for rehabilitation The use of tele-rehabilitation could be a promising tool to overcome burdens that restrict the access of stroke survivors to long-term rehabilitative care. VR-based interventions are game-like and therefore seem to provide a motivational environment which allows longer exercise sessions and greater adherence to therapy.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Disability and rehabilitation: assistive technology. - Oxon
Publication
Philadelphia : Taylor & francis inc , 2019
ISSN
1748-3107
Volume/pages
14 :1 (2019) , p. 2-11
ISI
000468172500002
Pubmed ID
30318952
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (open access)
Full text (publisher's version - intranet only)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 24.10.2018
Last edited 06.09.2021
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