Publication
Title
Reduction of human glioblastoma spheroids using cold atmospheric plasma : the combined effect of short- and long-lived reactive species
Author
Abstract
Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is a promising technology against multiple types of cancer. However, the current findings on the effect of CAP on two-dimensional glioblastoma cultures do not consider the role of the tumour microenvironment. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of CAP to reduce and control glioblastoma spheroid tumours in vitro. Three-dimensional glioblastoma spheroid tumours (U87-Red, U251-Red) were consecutively treated directly and indirectly with a CAP using dry He, He + 5% H2O or He + 20% H2O. The cytotoxicity and spheroid shrinkage were monitored using live imaging. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species produced in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and colourimetry. Cell migration was also assessed. Our results demonstrate that consecutive CAP treatments (He + 20% H2O) substantially shrank U87-Red spheroids and to a lesser degree, U251-Red spheroids. The cytotoxic effect was due to the short- and long-lived species delivered by CAP: they inhibited spheroid growth, reduced cell migration and decreased proliferation in CAP-treated spheroids. Direct treatments were more effective than indirect treatments, suggesting the importance of CAP-generated, short-lived species for the growth inhibition and cell cytotoxicity of solid glioblastoma tumours. We concluded that CAP treatment can effectively reduce glioblastoma tumour size and restrict cell migration, thus demonstrating the potential of CAP therapies for glioblastoma.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Cancers
Publication
2018
ISSN
2072-6694
Volume/pages
10 :11 (2018) , 17 p.
Article Reference
394
ISI
000451307700001
Pubmed ID
30360539
Medium
E-only publicatie
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (open access)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Project info
Low Temperature Plasma for applications in Medicine (LTPAM).
Improving cancer immunotherapy outcome by targeting hypoxia.
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 12.11.2018
Last edited 19.08.2021
To cite this reference