Publication
Title
G protein-coupled receptor systems as crucial regulators of DNA damage response processes
Author
Abstract
G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and their associated proteins represent one of the most diverse cellular signaling systems involved in both physiological and pathophysiological processes. Aging represents perhaps the most complex biological process in humans and involves a progressive degradation of systemic integrity and physiological resilience. This is in part mediated by age-related aberrations in energy metabolism, mitochondrial function, protein folding and sorting, inflammatory activity and genomic stability. Indeed, an increased rate of unrepaired DNA damage is considered to be one of the hallmarks of aging. Over the last two decades our appreciation of the complexity of GPCR signaling systems has expanded their functional signaling repertoire. One such example of this is the incipient role of GPCRs and GPCR-interacting proteins in DNA damage and repair mechanisms. Emerging data now suggest that GPCRs could function as stress sensors for intracellular damage, e.g., oxidative stress. Given this role of GPCRs in the DNA damage response process, coupled to the effective history of drug targeting of these receptors, this suggests that one important future activity of GPCR therapeutics is the rational control of DNA damage repair systems. View Full-Text Keywords: G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR); aging; DNA damage; β-arrestin; G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK); interactome; G protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein 2 (GIT2); ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM); clock proteins; energy metabolism
Language
English
Source (journal)
International journal of molecular sciences
Publication
Basel : Mdpi , 2018
ISSN
1422-0067
1661-6596
Volume/pages
19 :10 (2018) , 30 p.
Article Reference
2919
ISI
000448951000074
Pubmed ID
30261591
Medium
E-only publicatie
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (open access)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Project info
Arterial stiffening as a common pathophysiological mechanism in cardiac and kidney failure and brain degeneration.
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 23.11.2018
Last edited 04.09.2021
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