Title
Food calling by captive bonobos (**Pan paniscus**) : an experiment Food calling by captive bonobos (**Pan paniscus**) : an experiment
Author
Faculty/Department
Faculty of Sciences. Biology
Publication type
article
Publication
New York ,
Subject
Biology
Source (journal)
International journal of primatology. - New York
Volume/pages
17(1996) :2 , p. 207-217
ISSN
0164-0291
ISI
A1996UF58100003
Carrier
E
Target language
English (eng)
Affiliation
University of Antwerp
Abstract
We examined (i) whether bonobos display a specific food-calling behavior when discovering a hidden food resource, (ii) whether the presence of competitors affects this behavior, and (iii) whether food quantity or gender influences its appearance. We carried out experiments (n = 108) within a captive group of eight bonobos at the Animal Park Planckendael (Mechelen, Belgium). We hid highly preferred food items (n = 7 or 25) in their enclosure and recorded vocal behavior and interactions between discoverer and group members. As a control, we gave the same number of items to the individuals when isolated from the group, a situation without potential food competition (n = 38). The only vocalization frequently uttered by the discoverer was the food peep. They uttered food peeps significantly more often when no food competition was possible. The amount of food had no significant influence on whether food peeps were uttered The same applies to the individuals' identity or gender. Although the costs of food calling behavior seemed much higher for males, both sexes uttered food calls to the same extent. We hypothesize that males signal food presence in order to attract potential mates and are willing to give np the discovered food resource in return for sex: sex for food exchange. In contrast, females may vocalize to attract coalition partners. Through these coalitions, they can monopolize food resources vis-a-vis males. It is also possible that females have less reason to suppress food calls, since they are dominant to males. This study suggests that bonobos are able to give shaded signals about their environment and have the potential to communicate this information in order to promote their sexual strategy.
E-info
http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1996UF58100003&DestLinkType=RelatedRecords&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=ef845e08c439e550330acc77c7d2d848
http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1996UF58100003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=ef845e08c439e550330acc77c7d2d848
http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1996UF58100003&DestLinkType=CitingArticles&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=ef845e08c439e550330acc77c7d2d848
Handle