Publication
Title
Immunosuppression of Syrian golden hamsters accelerates relapse but not the emergence of resistance in Leishmania infantum following recurrent miltefosine pressure
Author
Abstract
Although miltefosine (MIL) has only been approved for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in 2002, its application in monotherapy already led to the development of two confirmed MIL-resistant isolates by 2009. Although liposomal amphotericin B is recommended as first-line treatment in Europe, MIL is still occasionally used in HIV co-infected patients. Since their immune system is incapable of controlling the infection, high parasite burdens and post-treatment relapses are common. Linked to the particular pharmacokinetic profile of MIL, successive treatment of recurrent relapses could in principle facilitate the emergence of drug resistance. This study evaluated the effect of immunosuppression (cyclophosphamide 150 mg/kg once weekly) on the development of MIL-resistance in Syrian golden hamsters infected with Leishmania infantum. The hamsters were treated with MIL (20 mg/kg orally for 5 days) whenever clinical signs of infection or relapse were observed. The immunosuppression resulted in a significant depletion of CD4+ lymphocytes and MHCII-expressing cells in peripheral blood, and a concomitant increase in tissue parasite burdens and shorter time to relapse, but the strain's susceptibility upon repeated MIL exposure remained unaltered. This study demonstrates that immunosuppression accelerates the occurrence of relapse without expediting MIL resistance development.
Language
English
Source (journal)
International Journal for Parasitology: Drugs and Drug Resistance
Publication
2019
ISSN
2211-3207
Volume/pages
9(2019), p. 1-7
ISI
000462490500001
Pubmed ID
30562667
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (open access)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Project info
Dynamics and mechanisms of paromomycin and miltefosine drug-resistance in the protozoan parasite Leishmania.
Identifying factors involved in miltefosine or amphotericin B treatment failure in visceral leishmaniasis.
Veterinary and human parasitology.
The role of parasite sanctuary sites and interaction with Kupffer cells in treatment failure of Visceral Leishmaniasis
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identification
Creation 18.12.2018
Last edited 24.08.2021
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