Publication
Title
Minimally invasive surgery in non-small cell lung cancer : where do we stand?
Author
Abstract
Simple Summary In the last twenty years, minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has radically changed the surgical landscape. In the field of thoracic surgery, approaches such as video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) and robotic-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (RATS) have become the new standards for the majority of procedures performed, especially for early-stage lung cancer. Despite these developments, there is still a lack of concrete data regarding treatment outcomes of these minimally invasive approaches compared to the conventional open surgery. In the future, the number of minimally invasive procedures will likely keep increasing as more lung cancer nodules are detected at early stages due to lung cancer screening initiatives. Therefore, data on short- and long-term outcomes of VATS and RATS in early-stage lung cancer is needed.Abstract In the last two decades, robotic-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (RATS) has gained popularity as a minimally invasive surgical (MIS) alternative to multi- and uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). With this approach, the surgeon obviates the known drawbacks of conventional MIS, such as the reduced in-depth perception, hand-eye coordination, and freedom of motion of the instruments. Previous studies have shown that a robotic approach for operable lung cancer has treatment outcomes comparable to other MIS techniques such as multi-and uniportal VATS, but with less blood loss, a lower conversion rate to open surgery, better lymph node dissection rates, and improved ergonomics for the surgeon. The thoracic surgeon of the future is expected to perform more complex procedures. More patients will enter a multimodal treatment scheme making surgery more difficult due to severe inflammation. Furthermore, due to lung cancer screening programs, the number of patients presenting with operable smaller lung nodules in the periphery of the lung will increase. This, combined with the fact that segmentectomy is becoming an increasingly popular treatment for small peripheral lung lesions, indicates that the future thoracic surgeons need to have profound knowledge of segmental resections. New imaging techniques will help them to locate these lesions and to achieve a complete oncologic resection. Current robotic techniques exist to help the thoracic surgeon overcome these challenges. In this review, an update of the latest MIS approaches and nodule detection techniques will be given.
Language
English
Source (journal)
Cancers
Publication
Basel : Mdpi , 2023
ISSN
2072-6694
DOI
10.3390/CANCERS15174281
Volume/pages
15 :17 (2023) , p. 1-16
Article Reference
4281
ISI
001061039200001
Pubmed ID
37686557
Medium
E-only publicatie
Full text (Publisher's DOI)
Full text (open access)
UAntwerpen
Faculty/Department
Research group
Publication type
Subject
Affiliation
Publications with a UAntwerp address
External links
Web of Science
Record
Identifier
Creation 02.10.2023
Last edited 25.04.2024
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